Sally’s Lesson

Tshepherd-boyhe last thing that I ever expected to fall from the sky was a lamb. 

That is exactly what happened today. 

I was going about my normal chores when a lady pulled into my driveway in a little Ford Ranger pickup. 

Before I can ask what I can do for her, she says, “I have a problem”

Now, this is not a normal way to start a conversation, except with your therapist. 

I am in no way a therapist, but I venture out on a limb anyway and say, “What can I do for you?”

She explains that she was driving down the highway in front of our home, following a pickup with sideboards that was crammed full of sheep.

(This is a fairly typical way of taking sheep to market in our area.  Don’t worry, she found it odd too). 

The truck hit a pothole in the road. Her jaw dropped as a lamb squirted out of the back of the truck and onto the road in front of her.  She hit the brakes, swerved to miss the lamb and brought her truck to a stop. 

After a moment to make sure what she had witnessed was real, she got out of her truck and went to check on the lamb. 

The lamb was fine.  A little scraped on its legs, and very shocked at finding itself on the road instead of under its mother, but nevertheless o.k.

She picked up the lamb (it weighed about 12 lbs), put it in her truck, and looked around for the sheep truck.  It was long gone.  She realized that she is now the proud owner of a lamb that will have a hard time living a natural life in her apartment in town. 

She pulled into the first driveway she saw, (ours) and was hoping to find this little lamb a new home before continuing with her errand running.

I graciously say that we will take the lamb. It will fit right in with our flock.  045

She thanks me over and over and leaves. 

My girls immediately fall in love with the lamb. It becomes “Sally”

It has a name.  Therefore, it is a full member of the family. 

None of the rest of the sheep have names. 

The lamb needs to be quarantined in case it is carrying a disease that could infect the whole flock.

The girls ask if they can keep Sally in the house……I take Sally to the barn. 

In about 15 minutes, Sally is out of the barn.  I look around and find my girls had nothing to do with it. 

They have moved on to the cute frogs in the sandbox…….. which will also not be kept in the house.

I take the lamb and put it in the barn. 

The lamb gets out of the barn

I put the lamb in the barn. 

The lamb gets out of the barn

I give up and let the lamb wander around.  She finds our big flock of sheep and joins them. 

I give up on the quarantine idea, deciding that what will be, will be and head off to bed.

Thbottlefeeding-lambse next morning, my girls get up to go check on Sally.

She is not in with the sheep. 

We do chores.

No Sally. 

We go to check on the horses in the pasture. 

Something small and white is in the distance.  It is moving in an odd manner. 

As the object gets closer, we realize that it is Sally.  Her hind leg is dangling by just the skin, having had the bone completely severed and broken. 

One of the horses must have gotten annoyed with Sally and kicked her. 

The girls come running, very concerned. 

I see the problem and try to explain to my girls that Sally is very small. 

She is hurt pretty bad and may not make it through. 

We do our best to splint Sally’s leg and put her in the chicken coop, where we hope she is secure. 

Six weeks go by. 

Sally is completely healed.  Her leg has miraculously healed straight and normal. 

She has stayed in the chicken coop, enjoying lots of love and attention from the girls. 

We decide that she is ready to go back in with the rest of the flock of sheep.

It’s morning.  We go out to do chores and find….Sally

She is dead.  Killed by a dog in the night.  

Sad ending?

Not what you wanted?

Me neither.  This little lamb refused to learn a vital lesson. 

No matter how hard we tried to protect her, she would not be protected. 

I expected Sally to live a long, happy, sheep life, and did my best to give her what she needed. 

She saw it differently. 

She saw greener grass.  She saw freedom.  She saw what was forbidden and went for it.

She died.

I have a responsibility. 

God promised to give me what I need to live and be happy. 

I have seen the grass beyond His boundary and it looks good. 

I see freedom to know everything.  I see what is forbidden and I go for it. 

I find myself in the middle of the garden with a piece of delicious fruit in my hand and a bite in my mouth that dosen’t taste quite as good as it looked. 

And I feel the disappointment of my Maker as He watches me.  It makes me ashamed. 

I want to hide from His sight. 

This is not what He wanted.

He planned so much more.

Time goes by…..

I look…

The grass seems really green…

I have freedom to do what I want…

The dogs are waiting.

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Published in: on November 8, 2008 at 9:05 am  Comments (4)  
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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Wow, Sally’s story really strikes a cord in my heart Josie. I’ll be sharing it with the youth a work with! Thanks for sharing. God bless you guys as you serve Him!

  2. No, that wasn’t the ending I had hoped for but It was a great lesson. I have loved reading all of these and can’t wait to read the next one. I am going to share them with my kids too and see if it inspires them to write something. We are in a Creative Writing Unit right now so this is perfect. Just think, you are contributing to our curriculum. Keep it up!

  3. i’m glad that God gives us lessons through sheep instead of always making us experience it firsthand. hopefully, we’ll let sally teach us to let Him protect.
    thanks for sharing!

  4. I didn’t leave a comment the first time I ‘visited’ this story but I have returned several times so I think it behooves me to let you know that this story is well written and I continue to find it’s message profound.
    Thank you for sharing it.


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